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Word Root Of The Day Archive

#103 Apr 04, 14

centr

center

The Latin root word centr means “center.” This Latin root is the word origin of a good number of English vocabulary words, including central, eccentric, and concentrate. The Latin root word centr is easily recalled through the word egocentric, for someone who is egocentric is someone whose own “center” or self is first and foremost, above all others.

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#102 Mar 05, 14

am

love

The Latin root word am means “love.” This Latin root is the word origin of a good number of English vocabulary words, including amateur, amatory, and Amanda. The Latin root word am is easily recalled through the word amor, or “love,” which is not only both the Spanish and Latin words for “love,” but is often used in English to refer to Cupid, the god of “love” whom we see flying around on Valentine’s Day causing so much trouble!

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#101 Feb 03, 14

loc

place

The Latin root word loc means “place.” This Latin root is the word origin of a large number of English vocabulary words, including local and locomotive. The word root loc is easily recalled through the word location, for a “location” is simply a “place” where something or someone is.

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#100 Jan 06, 14

cent

hundred

The Latin root word “cent” which means “one hundred” and the prefix centi- which means “one-hundredth” are both important morphemes in the English language. Some examples of words that derive from both this word root and prefix include percent, cent, centiliter, and centigram. An easy way to remember the root cent is through the word century, which is a period of “one hundred” years; a centimeter on the other hand is “one-hundredth” of a meter.

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#99 Feb 13, 13

de-

off, from

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The English prefix de-, which means “off” or “from,” appears in hundreds of English vocabulary words, such as dejected, deduce, and deficient. You can remember that the prefix de- means “from” or “off” via the word descend, or to climb down “from” or “off” a height, such as a mountain.

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#98 Feb 07, 13

auto-

self, same

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The Greek prefix auto- means “self.” Good examples using the prefix auto- include automotive and autopilot. An easy way to remember that the prefix auto- means “self” is through the word autobiography, or the history of a person which is written by that person her"self."

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#97 Jan 16, 13

medi

middle

The Latin root word medi means “middle.” This Latin root is the word origin of a large number of English vocabulary words, including medieval, mediocre, and media. This Latin root word medi is easily recalled through the word medium, for a “medium” temperature is right in the “middle” of being hot and cold.

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#96 Jan 08, 13

prim

first

The Latin root word prim which means “first” is an important contributor to the English language. This Latin root is the word origin of a good number of English words, such as prime, primitive, and primate. Perhaps the easiest way to remember that prim means “first” is through the adjective primary, for a primary concern is “first” above all others.

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#95 Dec 12, 12

multi-

many

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The English prefix multi- means “many.” Examples using this prefix include multivitamin and multiplication. An easy way to remember that the prefix multi- means “many” is to think about being super rich, for if you were a multimillionaire, you would have “many” millions of dollars!

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#94 Dec 05, 12

post-

after

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The English prefix post- means “after.” Examples using this prefix include postgame and postseason. An easy way to remember that the prefix post- means “after” is through the word postpone, for when you postpone something, you put it on your agenda to do “after” the current time.

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#93 Nov 26, 12

mot

move

The Latin root word mot means “move.” This Latin root is the word origin of a large number of English vocabulary words, including motivation, remote, and emotion. The root word mot is easily recalled through the word motion, for motion is nothing but “moving” of some kind.

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#92 Oct 24, 12

solv

loosen

The Latin root words solv and its variant solut both mean “loosen.” These Latin roots are the word origin of a fair number of English vocabulary words, including dissolve, solvent, absolute, and resolution. The Latin root solv is easily recalled through the word solve, or the “loosening” or untying of a complex problem, whereas the word solution is that which has “loosened” or untied the knot of the problem.

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#91 Oct 17, 12

cycl

circle

The Greek root word cycl means “circle.” This Greek root is the word origin of a number of English vocabulary words, including unicycle, recycle, and Cyclops. Perhaps the easiest way to remember that the Greek root word cycl means “circle” is through the word bicycle, which possesses two “circles” in the form of wheels.

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#90 Oct 02, 12

capit

head

The Latin root word capit means “head.” This Latin root is the word origin of a good number of English vocabulary words, including captain and decapitate. The root word capit is easily recalled through the word capital, the “head” city of a state, such as Madison being the capital of Wisconsin.

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#89 Sep 26, 12

vis

see, look at

The Latin root words vis and its variant vid both mean “see.” These Latin roots are the word origin of a good number of English vocabulary words, including visual, invisible, provide, and evidence. The Latin root vis is easily recalled through the word vision, someone’s ability to “see,” whereas vid can be remembered through video, or moving images which you “see” on a screen.

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#88 Jun 22, 12

onym

name

The Greek root word onym means “name.” This root is the word origin of a fair number of English vocabulary words, including synonym and antonym. The root onym is easily recalled through the word anonymous, which refers to someone going around without a “name.”

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#87 May 30, 12

ad-

to, towards

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The English prefix ad- means “to, towards.” Examples using this prefix include admit and adjust. An easy way to remember that the prefix ad- means “towards” is through the word advertise, for when you advertise you try to turn potential buyers “towards” the product you are selling.

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#86 May 23, 12

nom

name

The Latin root word nom means “name.” This root is the word origin of a fair number of English vocabulary words, including nominee and denominator. The root nom is easily recalled through the word nominate, which refers to someone being “named” to run for office.

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#85 May 16, 12

ver

truth

The Latin root word ver means “truth” or “true.” This root is the word origin of a fair number of English vocabulary words, including verdict and veracity. The root ver is easily recalled through the word very, for when something is very good, it’s “truly” good.

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#84 May 04, 12

a-

not, without

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The Greek prefix a- and its variant an- mean “not.” An easy way to remember that the prefix a- means “not” is through the word apolitical, which describes a person who is “not” inclined to favor politics. Someone who is anonymous is going around “not” having a name.

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#83 Apr 25, 12

son

sound

The Latin root word son means “sound.” This root is the word origin of a fair number of English vocabulary words, including sonar and sonata. The root son is easily recalled through the word sonic, for a sonic boom makes a deafening “sound.”

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#82 Apr 19, 12

lev

light

The Latin root word lev means “light in weight.” This root is the word origin of a fair number of English vocabulary words, including elevator and lever. The root lev is easily recalled through the word levitate: to make someone so “light” in weight that she can float above the ground.

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#81 Apr 11, 12

scrib

write

The Latin root word scrib and its variant script both mean “write.” These roots are the word origin of a fair number of English vocabulary words, including scribe, describe, postscript, and manuscript. The root scrib is easily recalled through the word scribe, whose job is “writing,” and script, a “written” document.

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#80 Apr 04, 12

hyper-

over, above

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The prefix hyper- means “over.” Examples using this prefix include hyperventilate and hypersensitive. An easy way to remember that the prefix hyper- means “over” is through the word hyperactive, which describes a person who is “overly” active in some way.

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#79 Mar 29, 12

hypo-

under, below

Prefixes are key morphemes in English vocabulary that begin words. The Greek prefix hypo- is an important morpheme of the English language. Examples using this prefix include hypothermia and hypocritical. An easy way to remember that the prefix hypo- means “under” is through the adjective hypodermic, which refers to going “under” the skin, especially when being given a shot.

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#78 Mar 21, 12

ann

year

The Latin root word ann and its variant enn both mean “year.” These roots are the word origin of various English vocabulary words, including anniversary and centennial. The roots ann and enn are easily remembered through the words anniversary, which is the turning of another “year,” and millennium, a period of 1000 “years.”

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#77 Mar 15, 12

tri-

three

The English prefix tri-, derived from both Greek and Latin, means “three.” Some common English vocabulary words that contain this prefix include triathlon, trio, and triangle. You can easily remember that the prefix tri- means “three” via the word tricycle, which is a bicycle with “three” wheels instead of two that promotes stability for young riders.

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#76 Mar 12, 12

syn-

with

The English prefixes syn- along with its variant sym-, derived from Greek, mean “together.” You can remember syn- easily by thinking of synonym, which is a word that goes “together” with another word because it has a similar meaning. You can remember sym- by thinking of symphony, which is a group of instruments making sound “together.”

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#75 Mar 06, 12

man

hand

The Latin root word man means “hand.” This root word is the word origin of a number of English vocabulary words, including manuscript, manufacture, and manicure. An easy way to remember that man means “hand” is through the word manual, an adjective which describes a task done by “hand.”

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#74 Feb 29, 12

bi-

twice

The English prefixes bi-, derived from Latin, and its Greek variant di- both mean “two.” The Latin prefix is far more prevalent in common words, such as bilingual, biceps, and biped; the more technical Greek di- appears in such words as diphthong and dilemma. You can remember bi- easily by thinking of bicycle, which has “two” wheels, and di- by remembering that the “dioxide” of carbon dioxide means that there are “two” oxygen atoms in the molecule CO2.

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